Where Trump won in NYC, residents allay immigrants' fears

In this Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017 photo, Ruth Silverberg, left, helps Maribel Torres prepare dinner at Maribel's home in the Staten Island borough of New York. Silverberg is one of about 30 local residents meeting regularly with Latino neighbors who lack legal status, to study ways to help them. Torres and Silverberg and their sons had dinner together to get to know each other and practice English and Spanish. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
In this Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017 photo, Axel, back left, and Jose Juarez, center, have dinner with with their mother Maribel Torres, left, and Ruth Silverberg and Silverberg's son Jesse, right, at Maribel's home in the Staten Island borough of New York. Silverberg is one of about 30 local residents meeting regularly with Latino neighbors who lack legal status, to study ways to help them. Torres and Silverberg and their sons had dinner together to get to know each other and practice English and Spanish. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
In this Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017 photo, Jesse Silverberg, left, talks to Axel, right, and Jose Juarez before dinner at Maribel Torres home in the Staten Island borough of New York. Jesse's mother Ruth Silverberg is one of about 30 local residents meeting regularly with Latino neighbors who lack legal status, to study ways to help them. Torres and Silverberg and their sons had dinner together to get to know each other and practice English and Spanish. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
In this Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017 photo, Jesse Silverberg, center, Axel Juarez, left, and his brother Jose talk to each other before dinner at Maribel Torres' home in the Staten Island borough of New York. Jesse's mother Ruth Silverberg is one of about 30 local residents meeting regularly with Latino neighbors who lack legal status, to study ways to help them. Torres and Silverberg and their sons had dinner together to get to know each other and practice English and Spanish. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
In this Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017 photo, Gonzalo Mercado, director of La Colmena, speaks during an interview at the La Colmena office in the Staten Island borough of New York. La Colmena has helped organize meetings between Staten Island residents who are US citizens with Latino neighbors who lack legal status to study ways to help them. Help may include offering space in their homes to their children if they are deported. The U.S. citizens say they want to assist because it's the right thing to do after President Donald Trump's guidelines aimed at detaining and deporting foreigners living in the country illegally. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
In this Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017 photo, Michael DeCillis, left, listens to Ruth Silverberg speak during an interview at the La Colmena office in the Staten Island borough of New York. They are among about 30 Staten Island residents meeting regularly with Latino neighbors who lack legal status, to study ways to help them, including offering space in their homes to their children if they are deported. The U.S. citizens say they want to assist because it's the right thing to do after President Donald Trump's guidelines aimed at detaining and deporting foreigners living in the country illegally. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
In this Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017 photo, Cesar Vargas, a young Mexican who last year was admitted to practice law in New York even though he remains an unauthorized immigrant, speaks during an interview at the La Colmena office in the Staten Island borough of New York. Vargas, along with La Colmena, helped organize meetings between immigrants and US citizens who are willing to help foreigners afraid of being deported. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

NEW YORK — About 30 New York City residents are offering their help and in some cases even their homes to dozens of Latino immigrants living in the country illegally.

Many say that if immigrants are detained or deported, they would be willing to take in their children.

The effort is emerging in Staten Island, the city's most conservative borough and the only one that went for Donald Trump in the presidential election.

Residents stepped forward soon after the election and asked an immigrant support group how they could help.

Over the past few weeks, the groups of citizens and immigrants have been getting together to make dinners, teach each other a little English and Spanish, and exchange phone numbers for day they hope never comes.

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